danesch.com | Dan Esch's blog | Archive by date Home

By date

2008 (12 posts)

July (1)

May (6)

Apr. (1)

Mar. (1)

Feb. (1)

Jan. (2)

2007 (29 posts)

Dec. (10)

Nov. (4)

Oct. (3)

July (2)

Mar. (3)

Feb. (2)

Jan. (5)

2006 (70 posts)

Oct. (1)

July (6)

June (3)

May (7)

Apr. (14)

Mar. (18)

Feb. (18)

Jan. (3)

2005 (75 posts)

Oct. (3)

Aug. (13)

July (14)

June (7)

May (4)

Apr. (7)

Mar. (10)

Feb. (10)

Jan. (7)

2004 (60 posts)

Dec. (9)

Nov. (5)

Oct. (4)

Sept. (5)

Aug. (1)

July (7)

June (7)

May (11)

Apr. (3)

Mar. (7)

Feb. (1)

2003 (18 posts)

Dec. (2)

Oct. (3)

Sept. (5)

Aug. (6)

July (2)

By category

Blosxom

E-mail Daniel Esch RSS feed
Wednesday, February 2, 2005

Neither here nor there

You! Learn something new every day!

Today’s entry is brought to you by Mass Comm 101: Media Law and Ethics, and comes from Don Pember and Clay Calvert’s Mass Media Law.

The concept of the “first freedom” has been discussed often. Historical myth tells us that because the amendment occurs first in the Bill of Rights it was considered the most important right. In fact, in the Bill of Rights presented to the states for ratification, the amendment was listed third. Amendments 1 and 2 were defeated and did not become part of the Constitution. The original First Amendment called for a fixed schedule that apportioned seats in the House of Representatives on a ratio many persons thought unfair. The Second Amendment prohibited senators and representatives from altering their salaries until after a subsequent election of representatives. In 1992, the economy-minded legislatures in three-fourths of the United States finally approved the original Second Amendment, and it became the 27th amendment to the Constitution. (©2005 McGraw-Hill.)

So, the First Amendment came third, the Second Amendment is really fourth, and the 27th Amendment was supposed to be number two. Got it?